Maximising Performance by Managing Networks

12 June 2013

Trinity House, Trinity Square, Tower Hill, London EC3N 4DH

Networks of both formal and informal relationships are increasingly the means by which organisations create value and drive innovation. This session will explore the impact on business results of managing networks, and how they can be improved at both organisational and individual level.

Who is it for?

Senior HR and OD professionals who wish to explore how effective networks can improve their organisation’s performance, as well as their own.

Overview

Networks of both formal and informal relationships are increasingly the means by which organisations create value and drive innovation. However, most leaders have only a vague idea of the networks around them and often don’t consider the possibility of trying to manage them to boost their organisation’s performance. This session will explore the impact on business results of managing networks, and how they can be improved at both organisational and individual level.

Content

Highlighting recent research into best practice in collaboration, we will describe how successful leaders gain performance impact by:

• Managing the centre of the network; minimising collaborative bottlenecks and acknowledging high performers who make colleagues more effective.
• Leveraging the periphery of the network: integrating newcomers and re-engaging high performers.
• Selectively bridging organisational silos: facilitating effective collaboration at key intersections in the network.
• Developing awareness of colleagues’ expertise: ensuring that the best expertise is known and brought to bear on new problems and opportunities and insularity is minimised.

We will also focus on personal networks and the role they play in individual effectiveness. Not all networks are equally valuable; those that make a difference tend to have three key features:

• A structure allowing high performers to place themselves at key points in the network and leverage their position when implementing plans.
• Investment in relationships that extend an individual’s expertise and help avoid or correct learning biases.
• Adopting behaviours that lead to high quality relationships, not just big networks.

The session will move on to identify six common network ‘traps’ to avoid.